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HOT OFF THE PRESS!

The results of our 2012 geolocator deployments are just published in the Journal of Avian Biology! The early view of this paper can be viewed here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jav.00721/pdf

In this paper our data has been analysed along with similar data from Pied flycatchers fitted with geolocators in the Netherlands, Finland and Norway. This shows some interesting and unexpected patterns of migratory connectivity between breeding sites and wintering locations.

This spring we deployed another 20 geolocators to adult Pied flycatchers at East Dartmoor NNR. These geolocators are smaller and lighter than the ones we used in 2012, weighing only 0.36 grams including the harness.

The latest update from network member David Price who monitors at Dunsford Wood, Dartmoor.

With all the cold, wet weather and the gale force winds over the past two days, I set off this  morning with some trepidation as to how birds had fared trying to feed young.  It wasn't actually too bad - most of the tits were big enough to put up with a couple of days of cold weather and a "light" diet for a day or two.  The first brood of Pied Flys had one dead - but it was the runt of the brood, and the second was similar.  However all the rest had come through relatively unscathed.  Several Blue Tit broods had fledged - hopefully not in the middle of the worst of the weather on Monday afternoon.   One brood of 10 "exploded" on me - had hardly opened the lid and they were all out!  Pleased to see that they were all very competent fliers, and were straight into begging for food on various branches - the adults were a bit phased by this, but soon got stuck in. The remaining paltry survivors of Great Tit broods are close to fledging, not a great year for their productivity I'd guess.

Managed to ring some more Pied Flycatcher broods, and catch a few more males birds. One bird at Box 21 foiled me at my second attempt - he obviously wasn't much into child care.  Was flitting about a fair bit, calling and occasionally singing, but wasn't going to bother providing food for his offspring.  As a result of capturing the male at Box 32 have detected yet another potentially unattached male - singing away whilst the breeding bird was safely ensconced in a bag. ...continue reading "June 3rd update from Dunsford Wood"